Teacher's Guide

Credits Home

The Teachers' Guide will walk you through the exercises contained on the website and will provide additional activities to be used in the classroom and home. The Educator's Guide is divided into four sections:

Conflict Resolution Education Overview

This section reviews the potential benefits both youth and adults gain from using the Think and Share negotiation process. This section will also review the underlying principles of conflict resolution education.

Activities

Here you will find additional activities that you can use in and out of the classroom to help youth build their peacemaking skills. The activities are divided into three subsections:

  • Skill-Building Exercises contains exercises that teach conflict resolution skills used throughout the Out on a Limb website.
  • Think and Share includes exercises around each step of the Think and Share process.
  • Handouts for the activities contained within the Activities section of the Teachers' Guide

Resources

Resource page lists contact information for conflict resolution education organizations.

Enjoy Out on a Limb–A Guide to Getting Along and thanks for trying to give yourself and your children a new tool to help manage conflicts.


Teacher's Guide

Credits Home

Worksheets

Communication Skills

Talking About What I Heard You Say

Conflict Resolution Styles

Think and Share Response

Steps to Think and Share Worksheet

Listening

Talking About What I Heard You Say

Perceptions

The World in My Eyes

Teacher's Guide

Credits Home

Activities

As you know, children learn in different ways. The Activities section should help those children who learn through practice and discussion about real and imaginary situations. Children will be able to learn the concepts practiced on the website through art, current events in their homes, language arts and discussions about fun things such as favorite movies, books, and games. It will also give you a better understanding of the theory necessary for the activities.

Each activity includes the following elements:


Teacher's Guide

Credits Home

Conflict Resolution Styles

Web Activity

Maria, Cliff and Jim, and Ann pages

Objectives

Children will learn the three ways people react when in conflict: loud, soft and think and share. Children will also learn some of the possible benefits and drawbacks of each of these conflict management styles.

Time Frame

30 minutes

Background Information

Children generally use two methods of dealing with conflict: avoidance and various forms of fighting, including yelling, and name-calling. A third choice, the Think and Share Choice, occurs when children communicate to solve a problem. A child's choice of style to resolve a particular conflict depends on: the importance of the conflict, the nature of the relationship with the other person, and the time available to resolve the conflict, among other factors.

The three Conflict Resolution Styles are:

Soft — Occurs when a child avoids a problem, gives in without expressing how he feels, denies a problem exists, and avoids relationships with other children he thinks he might have potential problems with.

  • Examples:
    • "You can have it, I don’t want to play with it anymore."
    • "It doesn’t bug me when you keep calling me names."
    • A child chooses to be unhappy by playing alone instead of dealing with another child with whom he has a problem.
  • Benefits:
    • The Soft style gives the child time to cool off.
    • The child can use the Soft style to ignore conflicts that aren’t really important to him.
  • Drawbacks:
    • The child never resolves the conflict so the situation stays the same or might get worse.
    • Only one person gets his/her interests met.

Loud — Involves a child's use of verbal or physical force to get what she wants. Force includes yelling, screaming, not listening, pushing, and fighting.

  • Examples:
    • A child punches another child after she is hit.
    • "You're stupid!"
    • "You wear old clothes."
    • "She's dumb."
    • "He's ugly."
    • A child refuses to listen to another child who wants to talk about a problem.
  • Benefits:
    • A child may need to use the Loud style to defend herself and others.
    • A child gets feelings of extreme anger off her chest by using force.
  • Problems:
    • The conflict is usually never resolved and it may get worse.
    • A child can harm herself and others.

Think and Share — Occurs when children openly communicate to understand what each person wants and what interests are involved. Children also develop ideas that meet everyone’s interests and needs.

  • Examples:
    • A child discusses how she feels when called names.
    • A child talks about why he doesn't like being bullied and what the other child can do to stop it.
    • The children with the problem don't dwell so much on what happened in the past. Instead, they focus on what should be done in the future.
  • Benefits:
    • Each child expresses his or her feelings and listens to those of the other child.
    • The conflict is resolved in a peaceful way, where everyone’s interests are met.
  • Problems:
    • It’s hard to listen, summarize and think of ideas to resolve the conflict when you are mad at someone.
    • The Think and Share response takes more time than the Soft and Loud styles.

When you explain the styles to children, emphasize that each style is valid in certain situations. For example, the Loud style is best used if someone is trying to physically hurt you or abduct you. The Soft style allows you to reach a safe place or get the help of another person if you cannot resolve the conflict on your own (problems with bullies or more than one child against you). Finally, the Think and Share style is best used when you feel comfortable sharing your feelings and thoughts, and you have the time to have this discussion.

How Much Do Students Know?

Before working on the website exercise or the additional exercise below, ask the kids how they would respond if they were in the following situation.

A friend borrows a toy or CD from you and breaks it. The friend refuses to replace it or buy a new one and calls you stupid for worrying about it. Write the children's responses on the chalkboard or newsprint, grouping them into the soft, loud and think and share styles. (See Figure 1) Introduce the three styles as the ways children resolve conflict.

FIGURE 1

Soft Style
  • I would just take the CD back and not say anything.
  • I would go home and tell my mom.
  • I would just stay mad and not play with my friend.
Loud Style
  • I would yell at him and make him buy another CD.
  • I would call her stupid and clumsy!
  • I would take one of his CD's.
Think and Share Style
  • I would tell my friend how bad I feel.
  • I would talk about it with my friend.
  • I would ask my friend to buy a new CD for me or give me one of hers.

Activity 1

Ask children to remember a problem or conflict they recently had with a friend or sibling. Ask the children which style they used to respond to the conflict. Have children draw a picture or write a story of that conflict and their style. Ask the children to think of what happened when they used that style as they draw and/or write. Ask two students that used the Loud style to share their story/picture. Ask:

  • What style did you use?
  • What happened?
  • After you tried the Loud style, what happened?
  • Did you fix the problem?

Discuss the activity by asking all the children why we sometimes like to use the Loud style. List the responses on the chalkboard or newsprint under the "Loud Style" heading. (See Figure 2)

Then ask children what are some of the problems of using the Loud style. List the responses under the "Loud Style" heading. (See Figure 2) Review both columns under the Loud style and emphasize the benefits and problems with the Loud style from the Background Information section. Repeat this with the Soft and Think and Share styles.

FIGURE 2 - Loud Style

Why do we use it?
  • Shows other person I'm angry.
Why doesn't it always work?
  • It makes the other person angry.
  • It makes the problem worse.

Note: For a quicker, more-verbal activity, have several students, representing each of the three styles, share their stories/pictures and why the style they each used did or didn't work. Review the benefits and problems of each style using each of the stories/pictures.

Activity 2

A variation of Activity One that can be used as a take home exercise over a number of days. Have each child think of his or her favorite book, movie, or cartoon. Ask them to think of a character from the book or movie that has used the Loud style to fix a problem. Have each child draw a picture of the character on the Conflict Resolution Styles: Loud Style worksheet. Discuss the reasons why the character used the Loud style and whether or not it solved the problem.

Repeat the process with the Soft Style Worksheet and Think and Share Style Worksheet.


Teacher's Guide

Credits Home

Communication Skills

Objectives

Students will practice and model good listening skills, become aware of the effects of cultural and other biases that affect communication.

Time Frame

30 minutes

Background Information

Listening is a process where a listener hears and understands the essential facts and feelings of the speaker. It is likely that poor communication between people is either the cause of a conflict or makes the conflict even worse. To help understand the cause of a conflict and the many ways it can be resolved, the people with the problem must listen to each other. People in conflict use the three listening skills below to express their own opinions while also understanding the opinion and feelings of others:

1. Body Language – using your body to show your are listening

  • Eye contact
  • Lean into the speaker
  • Ignore outside distractions

2. Talking About What I Heard You Say – summarizing what someone says in neutral language. Summarizing helps to make sure you understand what was said. It also helps the speaker because it gives them an opportunity to hear the interpretation of what they said, and therefore a chance to add to their statement. When summarizing, you restate the main idea of the statement and leave out the angry or accusatory words. For example:

  • Statement: "You are so stupid! I hate it when you play with me because you hit too hard! I'm going to play with Kara."
  • Summary: "You want to play with Cara because you don't like when I play rough with you."

3. Asking Questions – there are two types of questions you can ask to get more information:

a. Closed Questions – can only be answered with a "yes" or a "no". Closed questions are generally ineffective because they do not allow the speaker to explain her thoughts and feelings. For example:

  • "Were you angry when she said those things about you?"
  • "Did you do that?"

b. Open-Ended Questions – cannot be answered with a simple yes or no. Open-ended questions allow the speaker to express himself and do not lead him to an answer. For example:

  • "How did you feel about that?"
  • "What happened next?"
  • "What could you try to do to fix this?"How much do students know?

Effective communication skills are a vital part of conflict resolution education. Before starting the exercises, ask students to think about how they communicate in different situations. You might ask:

  • What are some things you do when you don't want to listen to someone?
  • What makes it hard to listen to other people?
  • Why is it sometimes hard to talk to people you have problems with?
  • What are some things you do to show someone you are listening to what they have to say?

Web Activity

Pages to be developed

Additional Exercises

Body Language

1. Bad Body Language - To learn more about body language, ask for a volunteer that is willing to talk about something s/he loves to do to have fun. As the volunteer thinks of an example, set up the exercise by telling the youth that they will evaluate your listening skills. Tell the group to identify both good and bad body language you use. Have the volunteer begin to tell you about his/her enjoyable activity. Practice poor body language by making some of the following mistakes:

  • poor eye contact
  • pay attention to distractions (shuffle paper, arrange things on your desk)
  • turn your back on the volunteer
  • look at your watch
  • roll your eyes

Allow two minutes. Process the activity by asking the group to tell you how effective a communicator you were. Ask the group to talk about your body language. List both bad and good body language on newsprint or on a chalkboard. Ask the volunteer how s/he felt talking to you. Ask the group:

  • Did you think I was listening to the volunteer?
  • Why or why not?

Explain that when we use poor body language, we stop people from wanting to talk to us because the speaker doesn't feel you are listening to them and know how they are feeling.

2. Body Language Practice –Tell the children that they will have a chance to practice effective body language. Have the participants find a partner and sit facing that partner. Ask one member of the pair to be "Person A", and the other member to be "Person B". Instruct Person A as follows: "You have one minute to tell Person B about your favorite book, song, movie or television show." Instruct Person B as follows: "Your job is to listen to Person A, but you may not speak." Allow one minute for Person A to speak. Call time and ask:

  • Person B, was it difficult to listen without interrupting?
  • Person B, did you want to question your partner?
  • Person A, what did your partner do that made you think he or she was listening to what you had to say?

Have the pairs reverse roles, and ask Person B to talk for one minute about the same topic while Person A provides listens without talking. Call time and ask the same questions as before.

"Talking About What I Heard You Say"

Tell the children that they will have a chance to practice the listening skill "Talking About What I Heard You Say." Have the children form small groups. Distribute the "Talking About What I Heard You Say" worksheet. Give each group two of the following statements and have them develop a summary of each statement as a group. Have one person from each group read their original statement and the summary developed by the group. As each group presents their summaries, check to make sure that they have used neutral language, included feelings of the speaker, and captured the basic facts of the statement. Below are suggested summaries for the statements on the "Talking About What I Heard You Say" worksheet.

Example One

  • Statement: "My sister is so annoying. She always comes in my room and touches my things without asking even though I tell her not to do that. Every time she touches my stuff I should just grab one of her CD's and break it!"

  • Summary: " You are angry because you think your sister goes into your room without asking you. You are also upset because of the way she treats the things you have in your room."

Example Two

  • Statement: Bryan has such a big mouth! He's like a little baby because he has to cry to all his friends and tell them things about me that I wanted to be kept secret. He should just mind his business and shut his stupid mouth!

  • Summary: "You are really upset about things being said about you to Bryan's friends. You him to keep things you tell him secret because you don't want everyone knowing about them."

Example Three

  • Statement: "When we play basketball she hogs the ball. She thinks that she is the best and that the rest of us can't play. She is so conceited and greedy."

  • Summary: "You don't enjoy playing basketball with her because you don't play as a team. You want her to include you in the game more."

Example Four

  • Statement: "I was angry at you because you didn't return the video games that I loaned to you. I told you I wanted them back in a week and you kept them for almost two weeks now. So I took the CD player that you left at my house and I'm going to keep it until you give me the games.

  • Summary: "You think that I kept your games for longer than a week. You're mad and took my CD player because you wanted to have something of mine to hold on to until I returned your games."


Teacher's Guide

Credits Home

Listening

Web Activity

Listening

Objectives

Children will practice and model listening skills: Body Language, Talking About What I Heard You Say (summarizing), and Asking Questions.

Time Frame

30 minutes

Background Information

We all generally think that we listen very well, but you can never practice listening enough. A major reason conflicts between children continue is because one or both children feel no one is listening.

Listening helps resolve conflict because it allows children to understand the cause of the conflict and the many ways it can be resolved. A child can use the three listening skills below to talk about what's on his or her mind while also gaining an understanding of the opinion and feelings of others:

  1. Body Language – To show he is listening without speaking, a child can:
    • make eye contact
    • lean into the speaker
    • ignore outside distractions
    • use facial expressions


    Remember that different cultures use different forms of body language. Use the culturally relevant body language, or as a rule of thumb, use body language that works. If a child does not like to make eye contact, for example, respect the culture he comes from and refrain from forcing him to do so.

  2. Talking About What I Heard You Say – A child makes sure she understands what the other child has said by summarizing in neutral language. Summarizing also helps the child that is speaking because it gives him an opportunity to hear the interpretation of what he said, and therefore a chance to clarify his statement. (See Figure 3) When summarizing, a child restates the main idea of the statement and leaves out any angry or accusatory words. For example

    • Statement: "You are so stupid! I hate it when you play with me, because you hit too hard! I'm going to play with Dan."

    • Summary: "You want to play with Dan, because you don't like when I play rough with you."

      FIGURE 3

  3. Asking Questions – A child can ask open-ended questions to make sure they understand the feelings and point of view of the other child.
  • Open-Ended Questions – Cannot be answered with a simple "yes" or "no." Open-ended questions allow the speaker to express herself and do not lead her to an answer. For example:
    • "How did you feel about that?"
    • "What happened next?"
    • "What could you try to do to fix this?"

How Much Do Students Know?

Before working on the Listening section of the website or working through the Listening Activity, ask students to think about how they communicate in different situations. You might ask:

  • What are some things you do when you don't want to listen to someone?
  • Why is it sometimes hard to talk to people you have problems with?
  • What are some things you do to show someone you are listening to what they have to say?

Review the three active listening skills: Body Language, Talking About What I Heard You Say (summarizing), and Asking Questions.

Activity 1

A. Body Language

1. "Bad" Body Language - To learn more about body language, ask for a volunteer that is willing to talk about something s/he loves to do to have fun. As the volunteer thinks of an example, set up the exercise by telling the other children that they will judge how good of a listener you are. Tell the group to point out both good and bad body language you use. Have the volunteer begin to tell you about his/her enjoyable activity. Practice poor body language by making some of the following mistakes:

  • poor eye contact
  • pay attention to distractions (shuffle paper, arrange things on your desk)
  • turn your back on the volunteer
  • look at your watch
  • roll your eyes

Allow two minutes. Process the activity by asking the group "Am I a good listener?" Ask the volunteer how s/he felt talking to you. Ask the group:

  • Did you think I was listening to the volunteer?
  • Why or why not?

Ask the group to talk about your body language. List both bad and good body language used on newsprint or on a chalkboard.

Explain that when we use poor body language, we stop people from wanting to talk to us because they don't feel we are listening to them when we use bad body language.

2. Body Language Practice –Tell the children that they will have a chance to practice good body language. Have each child find a partner and sit facing that partner. Ask one member of the pair to be Person A, and the other member to be Person B. Instruct Person A as follows: "You have one minute to tell Person B about your favorite book, song, movie or television show." Instruct Person B as follows: "Your job is to listen to Person A, but you may not speak. Practice good body language." Allow one minute for Person A to speak. Call time and ask:

  • Person B, was it hard to listen without saying anything? Why or why not?
  • Person A, what did your partner do that made you think he or she was listening to what you had to say?
  • Person B, did you learn anything new and fun about your partner?

Have the pairs reverse roles, and ask Person B to talk for one minute about the same topic while Person A provides listens without talking. Call time and ask the same questions as before.

B. "Talking About What I Heard You Say"

This activity can be done individually or in a group.

In a group, tell the children that they will have a chance to practice listening skills. Have the children form small groups. Distribute the Talking About What I Heard You Say worksheet. Give each group two of the following statements and have them develop a summary of each statement as a group. Have one person from each group read their original statement and the summary developed by the group. As each group presents their summaries, check to make sure that they have used neutral language, included feelings of the speaker, and captured the basic facts of the statement. Below are suggested summaries for the statements on the Talking About What I Heard You Say worksheet.

  1. Kara said, "Angela is so annoying. She always comes in my room and touches my things without asking even though I tell her not to do that. Every time she touches my stuff I should just grab one of her CD's and break it!"

    What did you hear Kara say?

    Summary: "You are angry because you think Angela goes into your room without asking you. You are also upset because of the way she treats the things you have in your room."

  2. Daniel said, "Bryan has such a big mouth! He's like a little baby because he has to cry to all his friends and tell them things about me that I wanted to be kept secret. He should just mind his business and shut his stupid mouth!"

    Summary: "You are really upset about things being said about you to Bryan's friends. You him to keep things you tell him secret because you don't want everyone knowing about them."

  3. Roberto said, "When we play basketball she hogs the ball. She thinks that she is the best and that the rest of us can't play. She is so conceited and greedy."

    Summary: "You don't enjoy playing basketball with her because you can't play as a team. You want her to include you in the game more."

  4. Chris said to Amy, "I was angry at you because she didn't return the video games that I loaned to you. I told you I wanted them back in a week and you kept them for almost two weeks now. So I took the CD player that you left at my house and I'm going to keep it until you give me the games.

    Summary: "You think that I kept your games for longer than a week. You're mad and took my CD player because you wanted to have something of mine to hold on to until I returned your games."

Teacher's Guide

Credits Home

Perceptions

Web Activity

How We See Things

Objectives

Children will gain a better understanding of perceptions and how different points of view about the same set of events leads to conflict.

Time Frame

30 minutes

Background Information

When a child is in conflict, she rarely sees the perspective or point of view of the other child. Conflicts generally turn into a contest around who is right and who is wrong.

Teaching youth to see conflicts from a different point of view enables them to appreciate the perceptions of others. It also allows them to realize that no one is right or wrong when in conflict. The goal is for the child to explain her point of view and listen to that of the other child. Ultimately, you want both children in conflict to understand how it might feel to be in each other's shoes.

How Much Do Kids Know?

Ask children to remember a recent conflict or problem they had. Ask them if they can picture the conflict from the point of view of the other person (say "Try to put yourself in the other person's shoes.") Ask the children why it is sometimes hard to see both sides of an argument.

Activity

  1. "Perceptions – The World In My Eyes"
  2. Necessary Materials
  3. Instructions
  4. Distribute the "Perceptions-The World In My Eyes" worksheet to each child. Also distribute a piece of construction paper and crayons or multi-colored markers. Tell the children to draw a picture on the construction paper of what they think the world would look like through the eyes of any of the creatures, characters, animals and items listed on the "Perceptions-The World In My Eyes" worksheet.

Teacher's Guide

Credits Home

Steps to Think and Share

Objectives

Children will learn how to look underneath what they say they want and discuss their true concerns or needs. Youth will also practice negotiating using the five-step Think and Share Response.

Time Frame

1 hour

Background Information

When children get into arguments with each other, they generally choose to use the soft and loud responses. Sometimes they choose to talk it out, but lack the structure and tools to be truly effective. The Think and Share response builds on the communication and perception skills practiced throughout Out On A Limb to help children manage their problems with others. The five-step Think and Share process is designed to give both children time to speak without being interrupted. Both students deal with the problem and don't get stuck fighting with each other. The five-steps are as follows:

Step 1: Choose to Talk It Over – Children agree to talk about the problem and try to work together to think of ideas that might fix the problem. Students also agree on any guidelines that are necessary to have a good talk about their problem, including:

Speak without interruptions - "I agree to listen without interrupting." Cooperation - "I agree to try and work on the problem with you." Privacy - "I won't tell anyone about what we talk about."

Notes:
1. Each student may reword these guidelines in their own way.
2. Never force a child to try to use the Think and Share process if she is not ready. If a child is forced into using the process, she will say whatever she thinks is necessary to get through it. This might lead to two children solving a problem in the short run, but the problem is more likely to resurface if one or both of them is forced into using the process.

Step 2: Talk About the Problem – Each child explains his or her point of view about the problem. Encourage the child that is not speaking to talk about what the speaker said as soon as the speaker is done.

Note: Try to have children move through this step very quickly. They just want an idea of what happened between them and how they each felt about it. If children get stuck in this step, they might begin arguing about each other's point of view. Using the "Talk About What I Heard You Say" skill helps prevent arguments because it forces the speaker to listen first rather than respond.

Step 3: What Is Important and Why – The children try to put themselves in each other's shoes by looking underneath the positions expressed and understanding the underlying interests. A position is what a child says he wants to result from the talk ("I want you to stop calling me names.") His interest is the reason why his position is important to him ("I don't like it when you call me names, because it makes me feel bad in front of my friends.")

POSITION INTEREST
Mark: "I want the videogame, dummy." Mark: The videogame belongs to him, and he likes to play with it.
Rob: "I'm keeping it." Rob: He feels disrespected because of the way Mark spoke to him.

If Mark and Rob above tried to use the Think and Share process to negotiate their positions, they would probably end up grabbing the videogame from each other—a worse situation than when they began. They will have a hard time finding win-win solutions that fix their problem unless they talk about their interests.

A child usually has a number of interests beneath his position. Mark above has two interests: respect for him and his property, and the videogame is really fun for him. Rob has only one interest in this scenario: respect for him. Can you think of any other potential interests of either child?

Step 4: Finding Ideas for a Solution - Win-win ideas meet the interests of both children involved in the conflict. Many children have a difficult time developing these ideas because adults resolve the conflict for them, or the children only think of things the other person can do to resolve the conflict. Step 4 allows those with the problem to think of their own ideas to solve their problem. Better solutions result because those with the best understanding of the problem have thought of their own win-win ideas. To effectively brainstorm, children should use the following guidelines:

  • Don't put down any ideas.
  • Think of things you can do to help solve the problem, not things you think the other person should do.
  • Think of as many ideas as you can.
  • Listen and be fair.

Step 5: Which Idea Is Best? – After developing ideas, the children must decide on which ones work best for them. A child should only agree to ideas she can carry out. Each idea must also be fair to both of them and follow the rules of the school or household. For example, no child should agree to throw spitballs, write on walls, or take things without permission if these things are against the rules. As the children discuss the ideas from Step 4, they begin to eliminate those that will not work for them. They might also try to combine all or parts of ideas to improve upon their brainstorming list from Step 4.

After eliminating and combining ideas, the children agree on a new plan of action with the ideas that help both of them. They make sure they understand what each child is responsible for under the plan. No plan lasts forever, so tell the students that they might try the Think and Share response again if any part of their plan falls through.

How Much Do Students Know?

Have students think about a recent conflict that turned out well for them. Ask them to talk about why they thought the conflict was a positive experience for them. Typical answers include "I got what I wanted," "She listened to me," "We became friends again," "I wasn't angry anymore." Explain that the Think and Share response to conflict allows people to:

  • Find out what the problem is.
  • Share their feelings.
  • Talk about how each person sees the problem.
  • Talk and listen to each other.
  • Come up with ideas that help both people and end the conflict.

Integrate the children's responses into this list as examples of each of the benefits of using the Think and Share process.

Additional Exercises

Exercise OneStep 3: What Is Important and Why?

What provides better examples of people in conflict than literature? Select a story or fairy tale that all of the children are familiar with. Divide the class into two groups. Have one sub-group be one character in the conflict. Have the other group be the other character. Have each sub-group write down the positions and any potential interests of the character they are playing. This will require a lot of imagination from the sub-group playing the role of the "bad guy" of the story.

For a discussion around Little Miss Muffett, you might get the positions of Miss Muffett and the Spider by asking each group: "What does Miss Muffett or the Spider say she wants?"

To have the children discuss interests you might ask: "Why might Miss Muffett want to sit in that spot to eat her breakfast?" or Why might the Spider not want Miss Muffett to sit there?"

Your children should develop a list like that below or one even more fanciful but loaded with insights about why the characters did what they did.

Nursery Rhyme: Little Miss Muffett

Character: Little Miss Muffett

Position

  • I will sit here and eat my breakfast.

Interests

  • I want to finish my breakfast really fast so I can meet my friends and have fun.
  • I want to eat my breakfast in peace, because my sister keeps making faces at me.
Character: The Spider

Position

  • Don't sit here!

Interests

  • You walked through my web, my home. I scared you to protect my home.
  • You were eating near my children. I didn't want you to spill anything on them.
  • I wanted to teach you a lesson so you could learn to respect other people's property.

Exercise Two – Conflict Scenarios

Materials

Instructions

Have the children form pairs. Ask each pair to decide who is Person A and who is Person B. Tell everyone that they will be playing a part of another child. They will each try their best to use the Think and Share response to resolve the problem. You will tell all Person As and all Person B's what the problem is about. Ask all Person A's to meet in the back of the room, while all Person B's will meet in the front.

Select a roleplay and meet with the Person A's. Read the Person A page to the children. Tell them to act out their parts and try to work out the problem using the Think and Share process. Instruct them that they can use the Out on a Limb Outline to try and work their problem out. You might also place a version of the outline on the board or newsprint. Provide the same instructions to the Person B group.

Give each pair 10 minutes to use the Think and Share process and then ask:

  • What did you do well?
  • What could you have done differently?
  • Was any step hard for you?
  • Did you make a plan to solve your problem?

Explain that children are not able to work things out all of the time. Children who are not able to make a plan to solve their problem have not failed. It takes hard work to use the Think and Share process. They can try to work it out at a later time, or can ask an adult to help. The important thing is that they try to work it out on their own with all of the tools they have learned from Maria and her friends.


Teacher's Guide

Credits Home

Welcome to the Out on a Limb: A Guide to Getting Along conflict resolution website! Conflict resolution processes are being used by parents, schools, juvenile justice facilities and youth-serving organizations to help teach youth to deal with life's daily challenges without walking away or fighting.

This website is designed to help teach youth how to better manage conflicts and challenges they face on a daily basis.

The activities on the Out on a Limb website are designed primarily for third graders, but can be used to entertain and educate youth from the second and fourth grades as well. We hope that you and your children can learn to manage conflicts peacefully while also having a lot of fun with Maria and her friends.

Children learn in different ways. This program, with these exercises, takes this into account. Some children may find some activities fun and love to do them while others might not be able to do them. Try different activities and different approaches. You know what works best, but try new things to find out ways that children can learn.

If you are interested in implementing a conflict resolution program in your school or organization, please contact any of the conflict resolution organizations listed on the Resources section for more information.

Choose a section below.....


Teacher's Guide

Credits Home

National Center for Conflict Resolution Education (NCCRE)
Illinois Bar Center
424 S. Second Street, Springfield, IL 62701

Conflict Resolution Education, Inc.
CRE, Inc.
P.O. Box 17241
Urbana, IL 61803
Richard Bodine, Director
Email: dick@resolutioneducation.com
Phone: (217) 384-411

One World Our World
http://www.1wow.org/
Phone: (800) 910-KIDS

The Art in Peacemaking: A Guide to Integrating Conflict Resolution Education Into Youth Arts Programs
http://www.arts.gov/pub/ArtinPeacemaking.pdf
This 2002 publication is the result of a four-year collaboration between the Arts Endowment and The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. Designed to strengthen arts programs directed to underserved youth, the initiative provided training in conflict resolution skills to the artists, staff, administrators, and young people participating in these programs. The National Center for Conflict Resolution Education developed and provided the training. This publication provides background on the partnership and the rationale behind blending the arts with conflict resolution. It details the nature of conflict and provides arts based activities and ideas for integrating the conflict resolution principles into all types of arts programs. The resources section includes a bibliography and descriptions of how participating programs incorporated conflict resolution principles into their daily activities. 78 pp.

International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution
http://www.tc.columbia.edu/icccr/
Teachers College, Columbia University
212-678-3402

Mediate.com - The World's Dispute Resolution Channel
http://www.mediate.com/youth/

School Mediation Associates
http://www.schoolmediation.com/
Conflict resolution resources for educators.